Instigating A Heroin Intervention

Heroin Intervention

How To Plan A Heroin Intervention

Heroin is one of the most extremely addictive drugs in the world, and overcoming it is very hard due to the severity of withdrawal symptoms. While substitution of methadone has historically been the most common method of heroin intervention, other ways of treating heroin addiction are evolving.

The very first thing to be done on heroin intervention is to act early as soon as possible. This usually doesn’t happen, but it is still important to note. A heroin addict’s chances of recovery are considerably increased if the problem is attended quickly, rather than after years of drug abuse. Unfortunately, many people lack a guide to treatment for heroin addiction and get quite lost.

Methadone substitution has a strong track record for heroin intervention. Methadone is a synthetic opioid that controls desire for heroin by deadening its effects on the body, thus eliminating withdrawal symptoms.

However, there may be a waiting list at a methadone clinic in some areas. It is also controversial as some say it just creates a new addiction. It’s proponents argue that it is a milder opioid and that the risk of using street drugs involves sharing needles , hiv infection and other diseases.

Also people can get involved again with work and normal functioning. It can be used both to detox as well as for maintenance to prevent relapsing.

New alternative drug therapies are being introduced as heroin intervention methods. Are you wondering what is suboxone that is in the news so much lately?

The use of dihydrocodeine and buprenorphine (also known as suboxone or subutex) are becoming more and more popular for treating heroin addiction. Buprenorphine, or suboxone, is similar to methadone, but with less effective opioid effects and much lower risk of creating another addiction of its own.

Dihydrocodeine, the newer one, comes at much lower price than methadone and is deemed as safer and less toxic yet equally effective.

Heroin InterventionThe drug addict generally is also involved with behavioral therapy as a part of heroin treatment. Physicians and psychologists recognize the efficiency of therapy as a treatment method.

Cognitive-behavioral heroin interventions, in which the therapist tries to help the abuser understand the things that led him or her on addiction in the first place, has been successful. However, experts agree that behavioral therapy is most efficient when combined with other treatments, most particularly drug substitution.

Preparation is a must in heroin interventions. While the most serious symptoms of heroin withdrawal usually end within a week of discontinued use of the drug, general irritability and craving for heroin can still ensue for months or even years.

Physical and psychological desires for the drug are the leading cause of relapse in abusers who have been treated for addiction. Drug relapse prevention is serious and a reason why people return to rehab facilities in a cyclic way. Continuous medical attention and therapy is utterly necessary to overcome such addiction issues.